Sorbent Products – Choosing the Right Sorbent Products For Workplace Safety

Spills are a fact of life in any industrial-type workplace. And so absorbent products like pads and rolls are an important staple in many work places. But which ones are the best ones to get? Read on and discover right sorbent products for workplace safety.

Say you’ve just finished work, you’ve got oil and grease all over your hands, and you need to wipe your hands. Without sorbent products you might be wiping your hands on concrete, the grass, or, worse — your clothes!

Of course, most businesses – especially mechanical repair shops and manufacturing warehouses- spend a lot of money on absorbent products and for good reason. And they also put some thought into getting just the right kinds.

Absorbents go a lot further than just a piece of rag or a scrap of paper towel, these days. There are specific products out there that are designed to soak up oil, anti static pads and even hazmat pads for unknown substances or substances that are known to be hazardous.

But let’s say you’re not looking for anything special, just plain absorbent pads or rolls of paper that can do the trick for a variety of cleanups around the workplace. You can have the choice of general purpose absorbents or economy absorbents in both rolls and pads.

While the general purpose ones have the benefit of being lint-free fabric, the economy ones will still absorb hydrocarbons like oil, gasoline, fuel, diesel and lubricating oils. The economy pads and rolls also have the benefit of being available for the “right price.” which makes them very popular.

But don’t overlook the general purpose versions. In addition to being made out of better material, the general purpose pads and rolls handle a broader range of fluids and oils at cleanup time. In fact, the general purpose pads will clean up all the fluids and oils the economy ones do, plus coolants, cutting fluids, hydraulic fluids, vegetable oil, acetone, turpentine, ether, MEK, hexane, trichloroethylene and more.

If you’re dealing specifically with oil then, that’s no problem either. In fact, there are absorbent pads and rolls that will repel and even float on water and, at the same time, absorb all hydrocarbons.

So now what about all of the hazardous stuff? Things like hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, nitric acid and caustic soda. You need special cleanup materials for these, and the hazmat line of absorbent products is perfect for the job.

For situations that require antistatic cleanup materials, you’ll find that specially treated meltblown polypropylene is perfect for the job. The antistatic pads and rolls will absorb all oils plus any other hydrocarbons, and they also come in a blue bag for quick identification, so they won’t be confused with regular clean up materials.

The latter products are the perfect choice when it comes to absorbing fuels that may become volatile in cold applications, in dry, low humidity areas or in any place where a potential for sparks exists.

Telecom Product Lifecycle – End of Maintenance – End of Support – End of Life

Network planning teams or Engineering Teams in Telecom companies are responsible for Planning and Designing the Networks. It is their job to select new products or upgrade existing deployed equipment in the Network. Telecom equipment is generally very expensive and the planning engineers must be very careful when selecting a product to meet their needs. One major aspect which engineers generally forget or not totally aware of is the Product Life-cycle, and it has also been observed that Vendors also do not inform customers or operators about the product life cycle if not asked specifically.

Point to note is that generally all Telecom products have a life cycle. A product has certain life and it goes through certain upgrade paths before it is declared “End of Life” or out of support. So when you are selecting any product for the Telecom Network make sure the product should at least have 5 to 10 years of life before its vendor discontinues its support. It’s because of the huge cost involved in buying the products. Telecom business plans are majorly impacted by the cost of the equipment used in the Network. So if the planning teams mistakenly select a product which is going to be end of life soon, then of course the company will have to replace the product soon, which will definitely affect the overall Business Plan.

Vendors plan upgrade paths in steps to earn more money and do not provide some features at once. You will have to purchase upgrades i.e. software and hardware both in steps, and planning engineers must be fully aware of these steps which are generally available in Product Road Map documents. If vendors do not provide the information then please ask them to provide in detail so that you properly and cost effectively plan your network life cycle.

Generally vendors do not give visibility of the product roadmaps more than 2 to 3 years ahead. You need to insist on getting roadmaps for next 5 to 10 years.

Don’t forget that you will not get any software or hardware support from the vendors when the product has passed End of Support Dates and there are different solutions available to the problem when your equipment is End of Life. You can ask the vendors for:-

* Extended support
* Buy some spare equipment and run the equipment yourself without support, it’s a bit risky
* Buy support from some third party

Anyhow you will have to purchase new products once they have passed End of Life dates and it has major cost impact on the business plans which must be carefully evaluated and planned.

Challenges Faced by Commercial General Contractors

Despite a rise in production last year, the construction industry is still likely to make a sluggish recovery. As the economy continues to recover from its recent downswing, the commercial construction industry also continues to grow. However, the industry is still encountering challenges that can affect businesses and investors. When it comes to effectively addressing and handling these challenges, hiring an experienced commercial general contractor is a good way to ensure that your project goes smoothly and successfully. Things are looking up a bit for the construction industry though.

New construction starts have been strong in recent months, construction spending rose throughout much of 2011, the production of construction materials has been up for six months in a row, and Caterpillar, Inc. and other large companies have posted strong earnings reports for the past couple of quarters a hopeful sign that small and mid-sized companies will also do better. However, the industry still faces plenty of challenges. Small companies for the most part are struggling because of the sluggish economy, increased competition, rising insurance costs and a shortage of excellent workers. The largest challenge, by far, commercial general contractors say, is the economy. Although the unemployment rate is dropping and the U.S. economy is showing other signs of recovery, economists and others say the recovery of the construction market will lag behind the overall economic recovery.

Commercial general contractors say homeowners and other customers are savvier in the wake of the recession and typically get three or four estimates before they decide whom to hire. This means commercial general contractors are competing for work against two or three of their peers now, compared to one or none before the recession.

People used to call and say, ‘Come do this job for me,’ and they’d get around to asking what it would cost. Yet another challenge is rising insurance costs. Insurance market conditions for U.S. construction fiĀrms began deteriorating in the second half of 2011, and that is expected to continue this year. Large losses and reduced investment returns caused many U.S. insurers to seek rate increases in 2011. As a result, rates for various construction product lines, such as general liability, builders risk, excess casualty and others, rose, forcing up costs for commercial general contractors, who passed them on to their customers. Cost overruns. Sometimes, projects can get “carried away” and can end up costing significantly more than anticipated. This can occur if materials need to be changed, if there are unexpected delays or additions, or if the planning got out of hand and the building ended up a bit more showy than originally anticipated.

Why Contractors Need General Liability Insurance

Regardless of if you are a general contractor or a sub-contractor, contractor’s general liability insurance is one type of insurance coverage that you can not afford to do business without. Not only will the majority of jobs require your company to provide proof of GLI (general liability insurance) before allowing it on their property, but neglecting to protect your assets with this wide-ranging kind of business insurance leaves you exposed to sometimes-catastrophic liabilities if mishaps or injuries occur during a job.

Things That Contractor’s GLI Covers

Contractor’s general liability insurance coverage includes a number of vital kinds of coverages, that collectively insure bystanders, customers, sub-contractors, and employees against these kinds of claims:

* Advertising Injury (i.e., libel and slander)
* Bodily Injury
* Personal Injury
* Property Damage
* Products and Completed Operations

In every case, the contractor’s general liability coverage covers legal and judgment expenses caused by claims being filed against the insured contractor. This generally includes all the other party’s hospital expenses, earnings lost, and all pain and suffering that could have been endured.

Whereas a few of the aforementioned kinds of claims (bodily injury, personal injury, and property damage specifically) are rather common on job sites, the necessity for others might be less evident for a contractor. For this reason, it may be beneficial to review each type of claim using an example of an occurrence that can result in this type of claim being filed against a contractor.

Examples of the Types of Claims Covered

Advertising Injury

Such a claim is protected by the vast majority of contractors’ general liability policies, but it’s probably one of the rarest to actually be filed. Advertising injury is defined as damage sustained as a result of another party’s use of slander or libel against the plaintiff. If you are a contractor, one example might be a sub-contractor submitting an insurance claim against a general contractor on the premise that his professional reputation and earning potential has been weakened by damaging reviews and publicity initiated by the general contractor.

Bodily or Personal Injury

A couple of the more-common claims made against contractors, bodily injury and personal injury claims occur anytime a third party (e.g. a customer or bystander) is inadvertently injured on a job site as the result of carelessness on the part of the contractor. Personal injury claims sometimes can include psychological and emotional injury that result from either negligent or deliberate acts by the defendant. One example is a bystander who is injured by a falling step ladder which was left unattended by the contractor within an area that gets significant foot traffic.

Damage To Property

The most-prevalent claim observed on job sites, property damage claims originate from damage or loss of property because of the insured party’s activities. Such actions might be either deliberate (whereby the injured party may additionally submit a personal injury claim for psychological and emotional injury) or accidental, and are occasionally filed due to damages or injuries that happen after the contractor has already completed the project. One common illustration of this would be a plumber who is sued because water pipes he installed begin leaking and causing damage to the walls and flooring near them.

Products and Completed Services

Products and completed services insurance is very critical to contractors, because it covers the claims that occur should a client believes that a job was not done appropriately. This might be by way of a foundation that eventually splits or a wall that collapses at some point after a job has been completed.

Which Kinds of Contractor’s Should Have GLI?

Contractor’s general liability insurance is vital for any type of contractor or subcontractor because, as you’re undoubtedly aware,our culture is one wherein some people utilize lawsuits, and the threat of lawsuits, as their principal means of settling disputes. Given that a contractor’s business requires him to pass long periods of time on other people’s premises, contractors and subcontractors are open to a tremendous array of liabilities that can transform into lawsuits at a moment’s notice. As a consequence, safeguarding your business and personal assets with a comprehensive general liability policy is not only smart – it’s a necessity if your company is to survive.